Yamaha Rev 5 (B Stock)

£60.00

Out of stock

Description

B Stock:  See Condition tab for more information on this item

Sold as seen, no returns on B Stock items


Yamaha and Roland helped kick-start the digital effects revolution in the mid-1980s. Up till then, outboard gear had been expensive German, American or British devices that did one thing and one thing only. By contrast, the new digital multi-effect units had dozens of preset effects at a fraction of the price of an EMT or Lexicon

Fast-forward to 2016 and these units look massively out-gunned by modern FX with their high sample rates and 16 or 24-Bit convertors. But these early devices sound different to modern ones and have a character all their own. 12-Bit encoding, limited audio bandwidth and primitive algorithms all help to create dark, smooth-sounding effects and grainy, unreal-sounding reverbs

The Rev 5 postdated the Rev 7 but appears to be identical. I know these early Yamaha units pretty well but I’m still unsure of the differences – if any. The two units look identical apart from the markings – Rv5 or Rev 7. The rest of this description is a cut & paste of my Rev 7 info

The Rev 5 has a palette of outstanding chorus, flange and phase effects. Symphonic is a favourite – it’s a stereo chorus which is great for widening synth pads & basses and creating subtle movement. It can be tweaked to be a subtle or as deep as required and is a good alternative to a Dimension D

The Rev 5 has many similarities to the SPX90 but adds balanced inputs & outputs on XLR and jack connectors, switchable front-panel 3-band EQ and a dedicated dry / reverb mix knob. Unlike the SPX 90 it has stereo inputs and a mono / stereo switch on the front panel. The EQ in / out & mono / stereo switches have nice obvious front panel indicators
“Yes, the Large hall is one of the Rev7/SPX 90/990 strengths. As was the Symphonic program – wonderful. As is the Gated reverb – snare power deluxe. All of those Yamaha reverbs are NOT good in terms of “natural space simulation”, they are not a Bricasti or even an old Quantec, they do subjectively “artificial”, hairier & granier reverbs that really stand out in a mix with their midrange, when U want a reverb to be “an effect”, to be heard, old Yamahas do that. Just ask Hugh Padgham, and many others” 

“I have to admit that i really like the Rev7 and use it side by side with my PCM70, my Bricasti and a few good plugins”

“Factory preset 5 (ER) is quite unique and I also like the prests 1-3 (large hall, small hall and vocal plate). Sounds old in a good way”

“I’ve used a REV7 for a short room for a couple years. I never change it. Nice thing about the REV series stuff is how they stick out a bit and can really thicken some things up when you want to hear the verb”

“I do not use very rarely, but I refuse to sell, mainly for some effects that I never managed to get with other machine”

Stereo inputs & outputs are on balanced XLR connectors and jacks at a nominal operating level of +4 dB. The rear panel also has Midi in & thru plus a socket for a dedicated remote control. 220 Volt AC power input is via a captive 3-core mains cable with a standard UK mains plug
19" 2U device suitable for all 19" racks. 220 Volt AC with a captive power cable with standard UK mains plug
Product Page http://usa.yamaha.com/products/live_sound/processors/rev7/ Audio Fanzine ★★★★ Review http://en.audiofanzine.com/reverb/yamaha/REV7/user_reviews/ Dancetech ★★★★ Review http://dancetech.com/item.cfm?threadid=403&lang=0
2U
Tested. Does not power up. Suspected failed power supply. Cosmetic condition quite good. Photos do not show the item for sale - they are of a Rev 7 sold previously Serial QK01003 B Stock items are sold as-seen with no returns. They have been tested, and a brief description of the faults or damage is given, but they may have other faults and may not test the same in future